Triang

Triang

The brothers George and Joseph Lines made wooden toys in the Victorian era

their company being G & J Lines Ltd.
Joseph was the active partner while George went into farming.
Joseph (or Joe) had three sons, who formed Lines Bros Ltd soon after First World War.
They were William, Walter and Arthur Lines. 
Three Lines making a triangle - hence Tri-ang. Arthur's son, Richard Lines, 
was largely responsible for the Tri-ang Railways system. 
At the start of the Second World War, production of children's toys was deemed non-essential 
by the British Government. 
As a result, production facilities were converted to weapons manufacture
specifically the Sten Mk III submachine gun. 
Manufacture of toys resumed shortly after the war ended.

At their peak they had 40 companies world-wide
including the famous Hornby, Meccano and Dinky brands
but as a result of losses overseas they were in financial trouble.
In 1971 Lines Bros. Ltd called in the Official Receiver. 
The Group was broken up and sold off. 
Rovex Tri-ang Ltd (which had the Hornby Railways among its portfolio)
was Pocket Money Toys Ltd and then sold as Rovex Ltd
complete with its factories at Westwood and Canterbury
to Dunbee-Combex-Marx Ltd. (DCM). G & R Wrenn, a linked toy railway company, bought itself free as Wrenn Railways. 
The remains of the Tri-ang brand was sold off. 
As a result the Tri-ang Hornby system took the name Hornby Railways from January 1972, 
With the Dinky and Meccano businesses being acquired by Airfix.

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